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Abstract

Through cultural and literary analysis, this study investigated the influence of dislocation on self-perception and the remaking of connections both through the act of writing and the attempt to transcend social conventions. Despite the uniqueness of each individual’s experience of dislocation, a writer is always in a process of redefinition and re-articulation in response to place, whether it be exile in Malouf’s Ovid, or a socio-cultural/inner sense of dislocation in the case of Parsipur’s women.

Keywords

Life narratives Dislocated writers Social conventions 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hasti Abbasi
    • 1
  1. 1.Griffith UniversityBrisbaneAustralia

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