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Business Discourse Teaching Materials

  • Cornelia Ilie
  • Catherine Nickerson
  • Brigitte Planken
Chapter
Part of the Research and Practice in Applied Linguistics book series (RPAL)

Abstract

This chapter will:
  • Identify a number of published materials that have taken business discourse research into account in presenting their approach to teaching;

  • Look at how to evaluate published materials and decide if they are appropriate for a given set of learners;

  • Speculate on the future of business discourse teaching materials and what they are likely to focus on;

  • Present a case study that shows how teaching materials can incorporate research ideas on business discourse, together with a set of tasks related to the development of materials, and a set of further readings.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cornelia Ilie
    • 1
  • Catherine Nickerson
    • 2
  • Brigitte Planken
    • 3
  1. 1.Strömstad AcademyStrömstadSweden
  2. 2.College of BusinessZayed UniversityDubaiUnited Arab Emirates
  3. 3.Radboud UniversityNijmegenThe Netherlands

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