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Crossing Over

  • Mani Rao
Chapter
Part of the Contemporary Anthropology of Religion book series (CAR)

Abstract

Fieldwork and mantra-sadhana as a methodology raised issues including insider–outsider positioning, experience-near and experience-distant approaches and how to navigate subjectivity. Rao reviews the relationship between practice and theory, oral and written, and folk and classical in India, showing how revelations are vast and continuous, and visionary experience permits revisions and dynamism. Indian conceptions of phenomena are different from the western—experiences are considered as evidence of progress and as by-products along a journey toward larger goals. The fieldwork was at Telugu-speaking locations in Andhra-Telangana, and the chapter concludes with some notes on the history of mantra in this region.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mani Rao
    • 1
  1. 1.BengaluruIndia

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