Advertisement

Seeing Like a Cop, Writing Like a Critical Scholar

  • Amada Armenta
Chapter

Abstract

I grew up 12 miles from the United States-Mexico border, where immigration enforcement was a daily reality that most people took for granted. In the following pages, I explain how an early interest in immigration enforcement inspired a research agenda that examines how immigration enforcement works and how immigration laws shape the experiences of Latino immigrants and their descendants. My research took me to Nashville, Tennessee, where I conducted interviews and did police ride-alongs to examine how local law enforcement agencies interact with immigrant communities. In this essay, I describe how I secured access to the police department, how I navigated the obvious differences between police officers and I, and how I moved beyond what police think they do, to critically analyze their contributions to American immigration enforcement.

Keywords

Ethnography Police Immigrants Immigration enforcement 

References

  1. Armenta, A. (2017). Protect, serve, and deport: The rise of policing as immigration enforcement. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bittner, E. (1967). The police on skid-row: A study of peace keeping. American Sociological Review, 32(5), 699–715.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Brown, M. K. (1988). Working the street: Police discretion and the dilemmas of reform. New York: Russell Sage Foundation.Google Scholar
  4. de Graauw, E. (2014). Municipal ID cards for undocumented immigrants: Local bureaucratic membership in a federal system. Politics and Society, 42(3), 309–330.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Epp, C. R., Maynard-Moody, S., & Haider-Markel, D. P. (2014). Pulled over: How police stops define race and citizenship. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Herbert, S. (1997). Policing space: Territoriality and the Los Angeles police department. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  7. Herbert, S. (2006). Tangled up in blue: Conflicting paths to police legitimacy. Theoretical Criminology, 10(4), 481–504.  https://doi.org/10.1177/1362480606068875CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Herbert, S. (2010). From spy to okay guy: Trust and validity in fieldwork with the police. Geographical Review, 91(1–2), 304–310.  https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1931-0846.2001.tb00484.xCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Manning, P. K. (1977). Police work: The social organization of policing. Long Grove, IL: Waveland Press.Google Scholar
  10. Moskos, P. (2009). Cop in the hood: My year policing Baltimore’s Eastern district. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Ramakrishnan, S. K., & Wong, T. (2010). Partisanship, not Spanish: Explaining municipal ordinances affecting undocumented immigrants. In M. W. Varsanyi (Ed.), Taking local control: Immigration policy activism in U.S. cities and states (pp. 73–95). Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  12. Van Maanen, J. (1995). Representation in ethnography. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.Google Scholar
  13. Varsanyi, M. W. (2006). Interrogating “urban citizenship” Vis-à-Vis undocumented migration. Citizenship Studies, 10(2), 224–244.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Varsanyi, M. W. (Ed.). (2010). Taking local control: Immigration policy activism in U.S. cities and states. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Walker, K., & Leitner, H. (2011). The variegated landscape of local immigration policies in the United States. Urban Geography, 32(2), 156–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Urban Planning, Luskin School of Public AffairsUniversity of CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA

Personalised recommendations