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Becoming a Police Ethnographer

  • William Garriott
Chapter

Abstract

Police ethnography is a field of interdisciplinary inquiry populated by scholars from a range of social scientific disciplines. Work in this area is united by the commitment to ethnographic inquiry—an approach which has traditionally been taken as offering an inside, up close view on the practice of policing as it takes place in daily life. This chapter charts the author’s circuitous route into police ethnography. In so doing, it shows how such an unconventional approach allowed the author to adopt a unique perspective on police and policing and revealed blind spots in the wider ethnography of police which have yet to be fully remedied.

Keywords

Policing Ethnography Anthropology Appalachia Methamphetamine 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Drake University, Program in Law, Politics, and SocietyDes MoinesUSA

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