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Rice Ecosystem Services in South-East Asia: The LEGATO Project, Its Approaches and Main Results with a Focus on Biocontrol Services

  • Josef SetteleEmail author
  • Joachim H. Spangenberg
  • Kong Luen Heong
  • Ingolf Kühn
  • Stefan Klotz
  • Gertrudo Arida
  • Benjamin Burkhard
  • Jesus Victor Bustamante
  • Jimmy Cabbigat
  • Le Xuan Canh
  • Josie Lynn A. Catindig
  • Ho Van Chien
  • Le Quoc Cuong
  • Monina Escalada
  • Christoph Görg
  • Volker Grescho
  • Sabine Grossmann
  • Buyung A. R. Hadi
  • Le Huu Hai
  • Alexander Harpke
  • Annika L. Hass
  • Norbert Hirneisen
  • Finbarr G. Horgan
  • Stefan Hotes
  • Reinhold Jahn
  • Anika Klotzbücher
  • Thimo Klotzbücher
  • Fanny Langerwisch
  • Damasa B. Magcale-Macandog
  • Nguyen Hung Manh
  • Glenn Marion
  • Leonardo Marquez
  • Jürgen Ott
  • Lyubomir Penev
  • Beatriz Rodriguez-Labajos
  • Christina Sann
  • Cornelia Sattler
  • Martin Schädler
  • Stefan Scheu
  • Anja Schmidt
  • Julian Schrader
  • Oliver Schweiger
  • Ralf Seppelt
  • Nguyen Van Sinh
  • Pavel Stoev
  • Susanne Stoll-Kleemann
  • Vera Tekken
  • Kirsten Thonicke
  • Y. Andi Trisyono
  • Dao Thanh Truong
  • Le Quang Tuan
  • Manfred Türke
  • Tomáš Václavík
  • Doris Vetterlein
  • Sylvia “Bong” Villareal
  • Catrin Westphal
  • Martin Wiemers
Chapter

Abstract

LEGATO stands for “Land-use intensity and Ecological EnGineering—Assessment Tools for risks and Opportunities in irrigated rice based production systems.”

Keywords

Irrigated rice Philippines Vietnam Ecological engineering Insect pests Cultural landscapes 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are indebted to more than 70 farmers who have wholeheartedly supported our research on their land. We also thank the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) for funding the LEGATO project (Funding codes 01LL0917A until 01LL0917O) within the BMBF-Funding Measure “Sustainable Land Management” (http://nachhaltiges-landmanagement.de), and especially Uta von Witsch for her continuous support from the funding organisation’s side.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Josef Settele
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    Email author
  • Joachim H. Spangenberg
    • 4
    • 5
  • Kong Luen Heong
    • 5
  • Ingolf Kühn
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stefan Klotz
    • 1
  • Gertrudo Arida
    • 7
  • Benjamin Burkhard
    • 8
  • Jesus Victor Bustamante
    • 9
  • Jimmy Cabbigat
    • 9
  • Le Xuan Canh
    • 10
  • Josie Lynn A. Catindig
    • 6
  • Ho Van Chien
    • 11
  • Le Quoc Cuong
    • 11
  • Monina Escalada
    • 12
  • Christoph Görg
    • 13
  • Volker Grescho
    • 1
    • 2
  • Sabine Grossmann
    • 1
  • Buyung A. R. Hadi
    • 6
  • Le Huu Hai
    • 14
  • Alexander Harpke
    • 1
  • Annika L. Hass
    • 15
  • Norbert Hirneisen
    • 16
  • Finbarr G. Horgan
    • 17
  • Stefan Hotes
    • 18
  • Reinhold Jahn
    • 19
  • Anika Klotzbücher
    • 19
  • Thimo Klotzbücher
    • 19
  • Fanny Langerwisch
    • 20
  • Damasa B. Magcale-Macandog
    • 3
  • Nguyen Hung Manh
    • 10
  • Glenn Marion
    • 21
  • Leonardo Marquez
    • 7
  • Jürgen Ott
    • 1
    • 22
  • Lyubomir Penev
    • 23
  • Beatriz Rodriguez-Labajos
    • 24
  • Christina Sann
    • 25
  • Cornelia Sattler
    • 1
  • Martin Schädler
    • 1
    • 2
  • Stefan Scheu
    • 26
  • Anja Schmidt
    • 1
    • 2
  • Julian Schrader
    • 27
    • 28
  • Oliver Schweiger
    • 1
  • Ralf Seppelt
    • 29
    • 30
  • Nguyen Van Sinh
    • 31
  • Pavel Stoev
    • 32
  • Susanne Stoll-Kleemann
    • 33
  • Vera Tekken
    • 34
  • Kirsten Thonicke
    • 20
  • Y. Andi Trisyono
    • 35
  • Dao Thanh Truong
    • 36
  • Le Quang Tuan
    • 10
  • Manfred Türke
    • 2
    • 37
  • Tomáš Václavík
    • 29
    • 38
  • Doris Vetterlein
    • 39
  • Sylvia “Bong” Villareal
    • 6
  • Catrin Westphal
    • 15
  • Martin Wiemers
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Community EcologyHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZHalleGermany
  2. 2.German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle-Jena-LeipzigLeipzigGermany
  3. 3.Institute of Biological Sciences, College of Arts and SciencesUniversity of the Philippines Los Baños CollegeLagunaPhilippines
  4. 4.Department of Community EcologyHelmholtz Centre for Environmental, Research–UFZHalleGermany
  5. 5.Sustainable Europe Research Institute SERI Germany e.V.CologneGermany
  6. 6.Crop and Environmental Sciences DivisionIRRI–International Rice Research InstituteManilaPhilippines
  7. 7.Crop Protection DivisionPhilippine Rice Research Institute, MaligayaScience City of MuñozPhilippines
  8. 8.Institute of Physical Geography and Landscape EcologyLeibniz Universität HannoverHannoverGermany
  9. 9.LEGATO OfficeBanaue, IfugaoPhilippines
  10. 10.Institute of Ecology and Biological ResourcesVietnam Academy of Science and TechnologyHanoiVietnam
  11. 11.Southern Regional Plant Protection CenterLong Dinh, Chau Thanh, Tien GiangVietnam
  12. 12.Department of Development CommunicationVisayas State University, ViscaBaybayPhilippines
  13. 13.Institute of Social EcologyUniversity of KlagenfurtViennaAustria
  14. 14.Tien Giang UniversityMy ThoVietnam
  15. 15.Agroecology, Department of Crop SciencesUniversity of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  16. 16.Science + CommunicationBonnGermany
  17. 17.University of Technology SydneyUltimo, SydneyAustralia
  18. 18.Department of Ecology, Animal EcologyPhilipps-Universität MarburgMarburgGermany
  19. 19.Chair of Soil ScienceMartin Luther University Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  20. 20.Earth System AnalysisPotsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK)PotsdamGermany
  21. 21.Biomathematics and Statistics ScotlandEdinburghUK
  22. 22.L.U.P.O. GmbHTrippstadtGermany
  23. 23.Pensoft Publishers Ltd.Institute of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  24. 24.Institute of Environmental Science and TechnologyAutonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)BarcelonaSpain
  25. 25.Department of Crop Sciences/Agricultural EntomologyGeorg August University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  26. 26.J.F. Blumenbach Institute of Zoology and AnthropologyUniversity of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  27. 27.Department of Biodiversity, Macroecology and BiogeographyUniversity of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  28. 28.AgroecologyGeorg-August University of GöttingenGöttingenGermany
  29. 29.Department of Computational Landscape EcologyHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZLeipzigGermany
  30. 30.Institute of Geoscience and GeographyMartin Luther University Halle-WittenbergHalleGermany
  31. 31.Institute of Ecology and Biological ResourcesGraduate University of Science and Technology, Vietnam Academy of Science and TechnologyHanoiVietnam
  32. 32.Pensoft Publishers Ltd.National Museum of Natural History, Bulgarian Academy of SciencesSofiaBulgaria
  33. 33.Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-UniversityGreifswaldGermany
  34. 34.Leibniz Institute for Agricultural Engineering and BioeconomyPotsdamGermany
  35. 35.Department of Crop Protection, Faculty of AgricultureUniversity of Gadjah MadaYogyakartaIndonesia
  36. 36.Center for Policy Studies and Analysis (CEPSTA)The University of Social Sciences and HumanitiesHanoiVietnam
  37. 37.Institute of BiologyLeipzig UniversityLeipzigGermany
  38. 38.Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of SciencePalacký University OlomoucOlomoucCzech Republic
  39. 39.Department of Soil SystemsHelmholtz Centre for Environmental Research–UFZHalleGermany

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