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“Everything Deserve to Live”: Salvage the Bones, Hurricane Katrina, and Animals

  • Christopher Lloyd
Chapter

Abstract

Examining Jesmyn Ward’s novel Salvage the Bones (2011), this chapter looks at how this novel represents notions of vulnerability and precarity across species lines, especially in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and longstanding racial dispossession. The chapter unpacks the knotty world of multispecies life, first through the novel’s obvious comparisons between people and nonhuman animals, and then through the character Skeetah, who is close to his pit bull. Ending with a consideration of the “flesh,” as articulated by the novel and Black studies, the chapter shows how, embroiled in the non/human world of the US South, Salvage the Bones configures corporeal legacies in creaturely ways.

Keywords

Animal studies Posthuman Hurricane Katrina Mississippi Jesmyn Ward Salvage the Bones 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Lloyd
    • 1
  1. 1.School of HumanitiesUniversity of HertfordshireHatfieldUK

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