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Communication-Human Information Processing (C-HIP) Model in Forensic Warning Analysis

  • M. S. Wogalter
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 821)

Abstract

A model that combines human information processing with communication theory is described: the Communication-Human Information Processing (C-HIP) model. Emphasized are the factors that can influence processing at various stages. Bottlenecks in the process can reduce warning effectiveness. The C-HIP model can be used (e.g., by manufacturers) to assess warning utility. Human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) experts can use it as a method to systematically structure their warning analyses.

Keywords

Forensic C-HIP model Warning Human information processing 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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