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Adventure, Capitalism, and Corporations

  • Simon Beames
  • Chris Mackie
  • Matthew Atencio
Chapter

Abstract

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:
  • Understand the significant impacts of capitalism upon adventure practice

  • Explain key concepts related to corporate ‘authentic’ branding and consumerism in the adventure world

  • Use the concepts of hegemony and discourse to explain the complex arrangements inherent in adventure consumption

  • Understand how the production of adventure goods may damage the planet and take advantage of people living in dire conditions who are desperate to work

  • Conceptualize what is neo-liberalism and how this has led to corporations deliberately fostering public initiatives for positive social change

  • Begin to understand how corporate involvement in adventure also supports new technological advances in adventure

Key Readings

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Beames
    • 1
  • Chris Mackie
    • 2
  • Matthew Atencio
    • 3
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.University of the Highlands and IslandsInvernessUK
  3. 3.California State University East BayHaywardUSA

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