Advertisement

Daily Adventure Practices

  • Simon Beames
  • Chris Mackie
  • Matthew Atencio
Chapter

Abstract

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:
  • Understand how adventure activities are part of people’s daily lives and social interactions

  • Characterize a range of key motivators which lead people to undertake daily adventures

  • Understand that daily adventures are complex and diverse activities that go beyond simplistic extreme sports stereotypes

  • Begin to see how daily adventure practices link with identity formation and one’s sense of self

Key Reading

  1. Spowart, L., Burrows, L., & Shaw, S. (2010). I just eat, sleep and dream of surfing’: When surfing meets motherhood. Sport in Society, 13(7–8), 1186–1203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Atencio, M., Beal, B., & Wilson, C. (2009). The distinction of risk: Urban skateboarding, street habitus and the construction of hierarchical gender relations. Qualitative Research in Sport and Exercise, 1(1), 3–20.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Atencio, M., Beal, B., Wright, E. M., & McClain, Z. (2018). Moving boarders: Skateboarding and the changing landscape of urban youth sports. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Bandura, A. (1977). Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change. Psychological Review, 84(2), 191–215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Beames, S., & Atencio, M. (2008). Building social capital through outdoor education. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 8(2), 99–112.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Beames, S., & Brown, M. (2016). Adventurous learning: A pedagogy for a changing world. New York/London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Brymer, E., Downey, G., & Gray, T. (2009). Extreme sports as a precursor to environmental sustainability. Journal of Sport & Tourism, 14(2–3), 193–204.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Brymer, E., & Oades, L. (2009). Extreme sports: A positive transformation in courage and humility. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 49, 114–126.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Brymer, E., & Schweitzer, R. (2013). The search for freedom in extreme sports: A phenomenological exploration. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 14(6), 865–873.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1990). Flow. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  10. Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1996). Creativity: Flow and the psychology of discovery and invention. New York: Harper Collins.Google Scholar
  11. Della Fave, A., Bassi, M., & Massimini, F. (2003). Quality of experience and risk perception in high-altitude rock climbing. Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, 15(1), 82–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Elias, N., & Dunning, E. (1986). Quest for excitement: Sport and leisure in the civilizing process. Oxford, United Kingdom: Basil Blackwell.Google Scholar
  13. Henderson, B., & Vikander, N. (2005). Every trail has a story: Heritage travel in Canada. Toronto, Canada: Natural Heritage/Natural History.Google Scholar
  14. Holyfield, L. (1999). Manufacturing adventure: The buying and selling of emotions. Journal of Contemporary Ethnography, 28(1), 3–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Gurholt KP. Joy of nature, friluftsliv education and self: combining narrative and cultural–ecological approaches to environmental sustainability. J Adventure Educ Outdoor Learn. 2014;14(3):233–46.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Gurholt KP. Norwegian Friluftsliv and ideals of becoming an ‘educated man’. J Adventure Educ Outdoor Learn. 2008;8(1):55–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Kerr, J., & Houge Mackenzie, S. (2012). Multiple motives for participating in adventure sports. Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 13, 649–657.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lave, J., & Wenger, E. (1991). Situated learning: Legitimate peripheral participation. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lynch, P., & Moore, K. (2004). Adventures in paradox. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 8(2), 3–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Maffesoli, M. (1996). The time of the tribes: The decline of individualism in mass society. London: Sage.Google Scholar
  21. Marsh, P. (2008). Backcountry adventure as spiritual development: A means-end study. The Journal of Experimental Education, 30(3), 290–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. McMillan, D., & Chavis, D. (1986). Sense of community: A definition and theory. Journal of Community Psychology, 14, 6–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Nakamura, J., & Csikszentmihalyi, M. (2002). The concept of flow. In C. Snyder & S. Lopez (Eds.), Handbook of positive psychology (pp. 89–105). New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  24. Outdoor Foundation. (2013). Outdoor participation report 2013. Outdoor Foundation, 37. Retrieved from http://www.outdoorfoundation.org/pdf/ResearchParticipation2013.pdf
  25. Pedersen Gurholt, K. (2008). Norwegian friluftsliv and ideals of becoming an ‘educated man’. Journal of Adventure Education & Outdoor Learning, 8(1), 55–70.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Poulson, S. (2016). Why would anyone do that?: Lifestyle sport in the twenty-first century. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press.Google Scholar
  27. Roy, G. (2014). Taking emotions seriously: Feeling female and becoming-surfer through UK surf space. Emotion, Space and Society, 12, 41–48.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Shoham, A., Rose, G., & Kahle, L. (2000). Practitioners of risky sports: A quantitative examination. Journal of Business Research, 47, 237–251.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Spowart, L., Burrows, L., & Shaw, S. (2010). I just eat, sleep and dream of surfing’: When surfing meets motherhood. Sport in Society, 13(7–8), 1186–1203.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Taylor, B. (2007). Surfing into spirituality and a new, aquatic nature religion. Journal of the American Academy of Religion, 75(4), 923–951.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  31. Thorpe, H. (2004). Embodied boarders: Snowboarding, status and style. Waikato Journal of Education, 10, 181–201.Google Scholar
  32. Wheaton, B. (2013). The cultural politics of lifestyle sports. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Beames
    • 1
  • Chris Mackie
    • 2
  • Matthew Atencio
    • 3
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.University of the Highlands and IslandsInvernessUK
  3. 3.California State University East BayHaywardUSA

Personalised recommendations