Advertisement

Conceptualizing Adventure

  • Simon Beames
  • Chris Mackie
  • Matthew Atencio
Chapter

Abstract

After reading this chapter, you will be able to:
  • Explain the masculine, capitalist roots of adventure

  • Define adventure

  • Understand how adventure is often associated with privilege

  • Explain key features of adventurous activities

  • Understand the relative nature of adventures

  • Explain Lynch and Moore’s ‘adventure paradox’

Key Readings

  1. Beames, S., & Pike, E. (2013). Outdoor adventure and social theory. In E. Pike & S. Beames (Eds.), Outdoor adventure and social theory (pp. 1–9). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Lynch, P., & Moore, K. (2004). Adventures in paradox. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 8(2), 3–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Wheaton, B. (2004). Introduction: Mapping the lifestyle sport-scape. In B. Wheaton (Ed.), Understanding lifestyle sports: Consumption, identity and difference (pp. 1–28). London: Routledge.Google Scholar

References

  1. Atencio, M., Beal, B., Wright, E. M., & McClain, Z. (2018). Moving boarders: Skateboarders and the changing landscape of urban youth sports. Fayetteville, AR: University of Arkansas Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Atkinson, M. (2013). The quest for excitement in parkour. In E. Pike & S. Beames (Eds.), Outdoor adventure and social theory (pp. 55–65). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  3. Beames, S., & Pike, E. J. (2013). Introduction. In E. Pike & S. Beames (Eds.), Outdoor adventure and social theory (pp. 1–9). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.Google Scholar
  4. Becker, P. (2016). A German theory of adventure: A view on the Erlebnispedagogik. In B. Humberstone, H. Prince, & K. Henderson (Eds.), Routledge international handbook of outdoor studies (pp. 20–29). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. Bell, M. (2016). The romance of risk: Adventure’s incorporation in risk society. Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, 17(4), 280–293.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Boje, D., & Luhman, J. (1999). The knight errant’s ideology of adventure. Presentation to the Academy of Management session on ‘Reclaiming Indigenous Knowledge’. Retrieved from https://business.nmsu.edu/~dboje/knight.html
  7. Booth, D., & Thorpe, H. (2007). The meaning of extreme. In D. Booth & H. Thorpe (Eds.), Berkshire encyclopedia of extreme sports (pp. 181–197). Great Barrington, MA: Berkshire.Google Scholar
  8. Borden, I. (2001). Skateboarding, space and the city: Architecture, the body and performative critique. Oxford: Berg.Google Scholar
  9. Breivik, G. (2010). Trends in adventure sports in a post-modern society. Sport in Society, 13(2), 260–273.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Campbell, J. (1949). The hero with a thousand faces. Princeton: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Cater, C. (2006). Playing with risk? Participant perceptions of risk and management implications in adventure tourism. Tourism Management, 27(2), 317–325.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tourman.2004.10.005 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Cohen, S., & Taylor, L. (1992). Escape attempts: The theory and practice of resistance to everyday life (2nd ed.). London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  13. Giddens, A., & Sutton, P. (2017). Sociology. Oxford: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  14. Goldenberg, M. (2001). Outdoor and risk educational practices. Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse.Google Scholar
  15. Loret, A. (1995). Génération glisse: Dans l’eau, l’air, la neige; la révolution du sport des ‘années fun’. Paris: Éditions Autrement.Google Scholar
  16. Loynes, C. (1998). Adventure in a bun. The Journal of Experimental Education, 21(1), 35–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Loynes, C. (2003). Narratives of agency: The hero’s journey as a construct for personal development through outdoor adventure. In J. Koch, L. Rose, J. Schirp, & J. Vieth (Eds.), Bewegungs: Und korperorientierte ansatze in der sozialen arbeit (pp. 133–143). Marburg, Germany: BSJ/Springer VS.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Lynch, P., & Moore, K. (2004). Adventures in paradox. Australian Journal of Outdoor Education, 8(2), 3–12.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Lyng, S. (1990). Edgework: a social psychological analysis of voluntary risk taking. Am J Sociol. 95, 851–856.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. McMillan, D., & Chavis, D. (1986). Sense of community: A definition and theory. Journal of Community Psychology, 14, 6–23.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Midol, N. (1993). Cultural dissent and technical innovations in the ‘whiz’ sports. International Review for the Sociology of Sport, 28(1), 23–32.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Mortlock, C. (1984). The adventure alternative. Milnthorpe, UK: Cicerone Press.Google Scholar
  23. Nerlich, M. (1987). Ideology of adventure: Studies in modern consciousness (Vol. 1 and 2, pp. 1100–1750). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  24. Pike, E., & Beames, S. (2013). Outdoor adventure and social theory. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. Rinehart, R. (1998). Inside of the outside: Pecking orders within alternative sport as ESPN’s 1995 ‘The eXtreme Games’. Journal of Sport and Social Issues, 22, 398–414.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Robinson, V. (2008). Everyday masculinities and extreme sport: Male identity and rock climbing. Oxford: Berg.Google Scholar
  27. Rojek, C. (1993). Ways of escape: Modern transformations in leisure and travel. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Simmel, G. (1919/n.d.). The adventurer (trans: Kettler, D.). In G. Simmel (Ed.), Philosophische Kultur (pp. 7–24). Leipzig, Germany: Kröner. Retrieved from http://www.osea-cite.org/tourismworkshop/resources/Simmel_The_Adventurer.pdf
  29. Soanes, C., & Stevenson, A. (Eds.). (2008). Concise Oxford English dictionary. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  30. Warren, K. (1996). Women’s outdoor adventures: Myth and reality. In K. Warren (Ed.), Women’s voices in experiential education (pp. 10–17). Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall Hunt.Google Scholar
  31. Wheaton, B. (2004). Introduction: Mapping the lifestyle sport-scape. In B. Wheaton (Ed.), Understanding lifestyle sports: Consumption, identity and difference (pp. 1–28). Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Wheaton, B. (2013). The cultural politics of lifestyle sports. Abingdon, UK: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Zweig, P. (1974). The adventurer: The fate of adventure in the Western world. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Simon Beames
    • 1
  • Chris Mackie
    • 2
  • Matthew Atencio
    • 3
  1. 1.University of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.University of the Highlands and IslandsInvernessUK
  3. 3.California State University East BayHaywardUSA

Personalised recommendations