Advertisement

Exploration: Wardopoly—Game-Based Experiential Learning in Nurse Leadership Education

  • Bernadette HendersonEmail author
  • Andrew Clements
  • Melanie Webb
  • Alexander Kofinas
Chapter

Abstract

Aspects of leadership and management are mandatory within UK preparation for nurse registration though when delivered through relatively passive lectures to large numbers of students, it is not surprising students struggle with applying the concepts to clinical practice. This exploration describes how a deliberate play-based strategy used Wardopoly, a bespoke in-house practice-based board-game adopting clinical simulation principles and game mechanics adapted from the Monopoly genre to empower students to voluntarily adopt actively engaged, self-determining learning behaviours. The success of Wardopoly as a learning tool is evidenced through student self-reported statements describing play as an enjoyable, thought provoking approach relevant to personal practice, prompting identification of future learning opportunities. The authors share positive and developmental pedagogical insights gained from embedding play and Wardopoly in the classroom.

Keywords

Nursing Experiential learning Board game Leadership 

References

  1. Barnett, L. A. (2011). How Do Playful People Play? Gendered and Racial Leisure Perspectives, Motives, and Preferences of College Students. Leisure Sciences, 33, 382–401. Available at https://experts.illinois.edu/en/publications/how-do-playful-people-play-gendered-and-racial-leisure-perspectiv. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Berland, M., & Lee, V. R. (2012). Collaborative Strategic Board Games as a Site for Distributed Computational Thinking. International Journal of Game-Based Learning, 1(2), 65–81. Available at https://www.researchgate.net/publication/254317022_How_Do_Playful_People_Play_Gendered_and_Racial_Leisure_Perspectives_Motives_and_Preferences_of_College_Students. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cessario, L. (1987). Utilization of Board Gaming for Conceptual Models of Nursing. Journal of Nursing Education, 26, 167–169. Available at http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/3035132. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  4. Duncum, P. (2009). Toward a Playful Pedagogy: Popular Culture and the Pleasures of Transgression. Studies in Art Education, 50, 232–244. Available at http://naeaworkspace.org/studies_single/Studies%2050(3)_Spring2009_individual/A2_Studies%2050(3)_Spring2009-3.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  5. Francis, R. (2013). Report of the Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust Public Inquiry. London: The Stationery Office. Available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/report-of-the-mid-staffordshire-nhs-foundation-trust-public-inquiry. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  6. Hainey, T., Westera, W., Connolly, T. M., Boyle, L., Baxter, G., Beeby, R. B., & Soflano, M. (2013). Students’ Attitudes Toward Playing Games and Using Games in Education: Comparing Scotland and the Netherlands. Computers & Education, 69, 474–484. Available at http://dspace.ou.nl/bitstream/1820/5037/1/Students%20attitudes%20toward%20playing%20games%20and%20using%20games%20in%20education%20Comparing%20Scotland%20and%20the%20Netherlands.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Kangas, M. (2010). Creative and Playful Learning: Learning Through Game Co-creation and Games in a Playful Learning Environment. Thinking Skills and Creativity, 5, 1–15. Available at http://psycnet.apa.org/record/2009-24961-001. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Knowles, M. S. (1970). The Modern Practice of Adult Education. New York: New York Association Press.Google Scholar
  9. Mainemelis, C., & Ronson, S. (2006). Ideas are Born in Fields of Play: Towards a Theory of Play and Creativity in Organizational Settings. Research in Organizational Behavior, 27, 81–131. Available at http://www.mainemelis.com/userfiles/articles/ROB2006_378019994.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Ng, G. M., & Ruppel, H. (2016). Nursing Simulation Fellowships: An Innovative Approach for Developing Simulation Leaders. Clinical Simulation in Nursing, 12, 62–68. Available at http://daneshyari.com/article/preview/2645953.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. NILD. (2016). Developing People—Improving Care: A National Framework for Action on Improvement and Leadership Development in NHS-Funded Services. National Improvement and Leadership Development Board. Available at https://improvement.nhs.uk/uploads/documents/Developing_People-Improving_Care-010216.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  12. NMC. (2010). Standards for Pre-registration Nursing Education. London: Nursing and Midwifery Council.Google Scholar
  13. NMC. (2015). The Code for Nurses and Midwives. London: Nursing and Midwifery Council.Google Scholar
  14. NMC. (2017). Enabling Professionalism in Nursing and Midwifery Practice. London: Nursing and Midwifery Council.Google Scholar
  15. Pluck, G., & Johnson, H. (2011). Stimulating Curiosity to Enhance Learning. GESJ: Education Sciences and Psychology, 2(19). Available at http://eprints.whiterose.ac.uk/74470/1/Pluck_and_Johnson_2011_Curiosity.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  16. Proyer, R. T. (2014). To Love and Play: Testing the Association of Adult Playfulness with the Relationship Personality and Relationship Satisfaction. Current Psychology, 33, 501. Available at https://www.zpid.de/psychologie/PSYNDEX.php?search=psychauthors&id=0288266. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Rudolph, J. W., Raemer, D. B., & Simon, R. (2014). Establishing a Safe Container for Learning in Simulation: The Role of the Presimulation Briefing. Simulation in Healthcare, 9, 339–349. Available at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25188485. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Smith, C. A., & Lazarus, R. S. (1990). Emotion and Adaptation. Handbook of Personality: Theory and Research (pp. 609–637). Available at http://people.ict.usc.edu/~gratch/CSCI534/Readings/Smith&Lazarus90.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  19. Spralls, S. A., Garver, M. S., Divine, R. L., & Trotz, H. (2010). Needs Assessment of University Leadership Programs. Journal of Leadership Studies, 4, 20–35. Available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/jls.20152/full. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Tanis, D. J. (2012). Exploring Play/Playfulness and Learning in the Adult and Higher Education Classroom. State College: The Pennsylvania State University. Available at https://etda.libraries.psu.edu/files/final_submissions/8092. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  21. Whitebread, D. B., Marisol, K. M., & Verma, M. (2012). The Importance of Play: A Report on the Value of Children’s Play with a Series of Policy Recommendations. Brussels, Belgium: Toy Industries of Europe (TIE). Available at https://www.toyindustries.eu/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Dr-David-Whitebread-The-importance-of-play-final.pdf. Accessed November 3, 2017.
  22. Yu, P., Wu, J.-J., Chen, I.-H., & Lin, Y.-T. (2007). Is Playfulness a Benefit to Work? Empirical Evidence of Professionals in Taiwan. International Journal of Technology Management, 39, 412–429. Available at https://www.deepdyve.com/lp/inderscience-publishers/is-playfulness-a-benefit-to-work-empirical-evidence-of-professionals-ExvldFn4xf. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Yue, X. D., Leung, C.-L., & Hiranandani, N. A. (2016). Adult Playfulness, Humor Styles, and Subjective Happiness. Psychological Report, 119, 630–640. Available at http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0033294116662842?journalCode=prxa. Accessed November 3, 2017.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernadette Henderson
    • 1
    Email author
  • Andrew Clements
    • 1
  • Melanie Webb
    • 1
  • Alexander Kofinas
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BedfordshireLutonUK

Personalised recommendations