Advertisement

Exploration: A Dancer and a Writer Walk into a Classroom

  • Seth HudsonEmail author
  • Boris Willis
Chapter

Abstract

Providing personal reflections on past playful experiences in the context of current practice in university instruction, this exploration examines how play can enhance teaching in game design and game writing courses. The authors make the case for reflective practice that calls on past experiences of play and personal identities as players, to optimize the implementation of play in pedagogy. Presenting narrative scenes from the classroom along with reflection, the exploration also highlights how disciplinary backgrounds—dance and writing, respectively—inform playful approaches in the classroom by fusing the personal and professional identities of the instructor.

Keywords

Playful classroom Game Story Competition 

References

  1. Brown, P., Roediger, H. L., III, & McDaniel, M. A. (2014). Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Bushnell, N. (1996). Relationships Between Fun and the Computer Business. Communications of the ACM, 39(8), 31–37. https://doi.org/10.1145/232014.232025.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Despain, W., & Acosta, K. (2013). 100 Principles of Game Design. Indianapolis, IN: New Riders.Google Scholar
  4. Newman, J. (2013). Videogames (2nd ed.). New York, NY: Routledge.Google Scholar
  5. Odyssey of the Mind. (n.d.) Available at https://www.odysseyofthemind.com/. Accessed May 30, 2018.
  6. Russell, D. R. (2001). Where Do the Naturalistic Studies of WAC/WID Point to? In S. H. McLeod, E. Miraglia, M. Soven, & C. Thaiss (Eds.), WAC for the New Millennium: Strategies for Continuing Writing-Across-the Curriculum Programs (pp. 259–298). Urbana, IL: NCTE.Google Scholar
  7. Salen, K., & Zimmerman, E. (2004). Rules of Play: Game Design Fundamentals. Cambridge: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  8. Selingo, J. (2013). College (Un)bound: The Future of Higher Education and What It Means for Students. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.Google Scholar
  9. Sheldon, L. (2012). The Multiplayer Classroom: Designing Coursework as a Game. Boston, MA: Course Technology.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.George Mason UniversityFairfaxUSA

Personalised recommendations