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Introduction: Theatrical Encounters

  • Daniel Koczy
Chapter
Part of the Performance Philosophy book series (PPH)

Abstract

This chapter outlines how the project will propose a new method for research situated at the borders of performance and philosophy, the theatre and performance theory. Beginning with an account of Samuel Beckett’s Catastrophe, it argues that Beckett’s theatrical practices are guided by a desire to create encounters with an indeterminate and unthinkable chaos which is opposed to the very possibility of meaning. It also argues that Gilles Deleuze’s conception of philosophical practice offers tools for pursuing this aspect of Beckett’s theatre. Having provided a brief history of the field of Beckett studies oriented around this question, it then offers an introduction to Deleuze’s accounts of difference, immanence and the unthinkable. Finally, it presents an account of Catastrophe generated with these concerns in mind.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Koczy
    • 1
  1. 1.Newcastle upon TyneUK

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