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Negotiating Research Access: The Interplay Between Politics and Academia in Contemporary Zimbabwe

  • Joshua Pritchard
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, Josh Pritchard tells the story of his attempts to secure a research permit to conduct historical research in the National Archives of Zimbabwe. This process, like that in many African states, involves gaining affiliation with a national partner, often in the business of research, such as a university or a think tank. Pritchard’s often frustrating journey pitted the official narrative of the Zimbabwean government, which advises all applicants to make their application remotely, against the advice from those who had experience with the application process first-hand to go to Zimbabwe and make his presence known. Pritchard never was successful in gaining the official permit, but he offers some valuable advice for novice researchers facing similar situations.

Keywords

Zimbabwe Access Research permit Zimbabwe–Britain relations 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joshua Pritchard
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CambridgeCambridgeUK

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