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The (Not So Pure) Concept of Diplomacy

  • Yolanda Kemp Spies
Chapter

Abstract

In this chapter, Spies provides a conceptual framework for the academic study of diplomacy. Diplomatic theory is examined, with explanation of who is writing about diplomacy and why they are doing so. Key assumptions about diplomacy are investigated: Is it always peaceful and geared towards peaceful outcomes? Are states the only international actors who ‘do’ diplomacy? Why is there a distinct (and controversial) relationship between power and diplomacy? Diplomacy’s position vis-à-vis foreign policy and the latter’s spectrum of instruments is explained; as are elements that are central to the intrinsic nature of diplomacy: intermediation, representation, authority, reciprocity and continuous communication. Providing thus the wider conceptual context, this chapter makes it clear why diplomacy is—and has always been—a central institution of international society.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of JohannesburgJohannesburgSouth Africa

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