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Acting Space

  • Zachary Dunbar
  • Stephe Harrop
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter begins by introducing different conceptions of space present in the earliest performances of tragedy, using the categories of mimetic space, transformational space, community space, and agonistic space to identify the range of challenges and opportunities confronting the contemporary performer. It counters Aristotelian disdain for the practicalities of staging a play by developing a revisionary account of ancient playwrights as skilful practitioners of ‘spatial poetry’. It also draws on Viewpoints practice and Jacques Lecoq’s chorus exercises to explore how contemporary actors of tragedy can develop more attentive and provocative relationships with space, and with one another’s bodies in motion, as well as considering how current theatre-makers have re-activated ancient tragic plays in site-specific contexts.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Dunbar
    • 1
  • Stephe Harrop
    • 2
  1. 1.Victorian College of the ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Liverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK

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