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The Aristotle Legacy

  • Zachary Dunbar
  • Stephe Harrop
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter highlights the way in which Aristotelian perspectives limit the contemporary actor’s ability to engage effectively with ancient tragic drama, leading them to mislocate the problems such plays pose, and misunderstand the manifold possibilities represented by the genre’s challenges. This chapter contends that the perspective of the theatre historian, concerned with the relationships between play-texts, theatre practices, and their changing cultural contexts, can help establish a clearer sense of how the Poetics responds to tragic performance in the fourth century BCE, proposing a revisionary identification of Aristotle as a proto-Hellenistic figure. A closing discussion highlights the ways in which Aristotelian presumptions about the nature and function of tragedy set the stage for particular (mis)applications of Stanislavski-inspired practices.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Dunbar
    • 1
  • Stephe Harrop
    • 2
  1. 1.Victorian College of the ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Liverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK

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