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Introduction

  • Zachary Dunbar
  • Stephe Harrop
Chapter

Abstract

The introduction to Greek Tragedy and the Contemporary Actor presents some of the major challenges facing the would-be performer of tragedies today, including the ongoing dominance of Aristotelian models in actor training, and the ways in which such perspectives appear to endorse acting approaches drawn from Stanislavski’s early (analytic, psychologizing) pedagogy. However (it is contended) the surviving texts of Greek tragedy, understood in relation to their earliest performance culture, to contemporary psychophysical acting, and to collaborative theatre-making practices, potentially offer a much richer and more demanding set of provocations, requiring (and inviting) the contemporary actor to engage with breath, sound, music, song, storytelling, space, architecture, embodiment, transformation, and choral or ensemble practices—or any combination of these.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zachary Dunbar
    • 1
  • Stephe Harrop
    • 2
  1. 1.Victorian College of the ArtsUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Liverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK

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