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The Teachers’ Own Music Learning Experiences and Personal Beliefs

  • Georgina Barton
Chapter

Abstract

The ways in which music can be taught are wide-ranging. Many scholars have shown how these approaches can be influenced by the particular socio-cultural context in which the music is transmitted. Aspects such as how to share music knowledge and skills via different modes of communication as well as particular teaching strategies can share important information to others who teach music. Further understanding of these modes and methods can highlight how diverse music learning and teaching practices are. This chapter, therefore, investigates how each of the teachers observed transmitted information and also how students acquire music knowledge in diverse spaces.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georgina Barton
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Teacher Education and Early ChildhoodUniversity of Southern QueenslandSpringfield Central, BrisbaneAustralia

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