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Diverse Learning and Teaching Contexts: What Methods and Modes Look Like in Context

  • Georgina Barton
Chapter

Abstract

Music teachers come from diverse backgrounds and also work in varied contexts. This chapter introduces a number of music teachers who work across different teaching environments. General descriptions of the music lessons these teachers present to their students are provided. Also important in various music learning and teaching contexts is the space in which the teaching takes place. The ways in which the teachers set up their teaching location including: how they are placed in relation to their students; what furniture or equipment is used; as well as how many students attend lessons, are all important features of music lessons. The regularity and conditions by which the music teachers teach are explored in order to identify how these influence each teachers’ own philosophies towards music teaching.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Georgina Barton
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Teacher Education and Early ChildhoodUniversity of Southern QueenslandSpringfield Central, BrisbaneAustralia

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