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A Meta-ethnography of Research on Education Justice and Inclusion in Sweden with a Focus on Territorially Stigmatised Areas

  • Dennis Beach
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is based on meta-ethnographic analyses carried out in recent research articles published in 2017 in the journals of Education and Ethnography and Educational Review and a recent book chapter. Making use of and bridging over the previous chapters the chapter identifies a number of historical place related legacies that seem to restrain the recognition of positive learning and creativity in areas that were previously used to house a white peri-urban industrial working class, but that have changed character in recent decades subsequent to capitalism’s globalisation and in the wake of a series of migration flows. The areas that once housed the industrial working class population have become populated by an economically precarious and often trans-nationalist population without work (Beach and Sernhede, Br J Sociol Educ, 32: 257–274, 2011). They are often referred to as “off-places” by national citizens. Young people there have problems in education and these problems are identified and discussed as real in the chapter, but as also very different to the way they are documented in mainstream education research and formal policy, which tend to individualise these difficulties.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dennis Beach
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Education and Special EducationUniversity of GothenburgGöteborgSweden

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