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Policy Opportunities to Improve Access to Quality Pain and Palliative Care Services

  • Diane E. MeierEmail author
  • Stacie Sinclair
Chapter

Abstract

Health-care reform presented numerous opportunities to alleviate patient and family suffering through the testing of new delivery and payment models. In addition to encouraging innovative approaches that would improve care, improve outcomes, and reduce cost, stakeholders emphasized concepts such as care coordination and patient engagement. Thus, health-care reform opened the door for the emerging field of palliative care to deliver on these challenges by (1) relieving symptoms including physical and emotional pain, (2) improving patient–professional communication and decision-making, and (3) coordinating care across settings. As US health policy enters a new era, the field can leverage progress from recent years to continue expanding access to palliative care for seriously ill patients and their families.

Keywords

Palliative care Health reform Value-based payment Serious illness Health expenditures High-need high-cost Quality measurement Triple aim Payment model Delivery model Workforce Access Research Public awareness 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Center to Advance Palliative Care, Hertzberg Palliative Care InstituteNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Geriatrics and Palliative Medicine and Internal MedicineMount Sinai School of MedicineNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Center to Advance Palliative CareNew YorkUSA

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