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Assessing Energy Impacts of Connected and Automated Vehicles at the U.S. National Level—Preliminary Bounds and Proposed Methods

  • Thomas S. Stephens
  • Josh Auld
  • Yuche Chen
  • Jeffrey Gonder
  • Eleftheria Kontou
  • Zhenhong Lin
  • Fei Xie
  • Abolfazl (Kouros) Mohammadian
  • Ramin Shabanpour
  • David Gohlke
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Mobility book series (LNMOB)

Abstract

Connected and automated vehicles (CAVs) can have tremendous impacts on transportation energy use. Using published literature to establish bounds for factors impacting vehicle demand and vehicle efficiency, we find that CAVs can potentially lead to a threefold increase or decrease in light-duty vehicle energy consumption in the United States. Much of this uncertainty is due to possible changes in travel patterns (in vehicle miles traveled) or fuel efficiency (in gallons per mile), as well as future adoption levels and patterns of use. This chapter details the factors which go into these estimates, and presents a methodological approach for refining this wide range of estimated fuel consumption.

Keywords

Energy Transportation Passenger vehicles Automated vehicles Connected vehicles Demand Efficiency 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This report and the work described were sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) under the Systems and Modeling for Accelerated Research in Transportation (SMART) Mobility Laboratory Consortium, an initiative of the Energy Efficient Mobility Systems (EEMS) Program. The authors acknowledge Eric Rask of Argonne National Laboratory for leading the Connected and Automated Vehicle Pillar of the SMART Mobility Laboratory Consortium. Rachael Nealer and David Anderson of the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) played important roles in establishing the project concept, advancing implementation, and providing ongoing guidance.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas S. Stephens
    • 1
  • Josh Auld
    • 1
  • Yuche Chen
    • 2
  • Jeffrey Gonder
    • 3
  • Eleftheria Kontou
    • 3
  • Zhenhong Lin
    • 4
  • Fei Xie
    • 4
  • Abolfazl (Kouros) Mohammadian
    • 5
  • Ramin Shabanpour
    • 5
  • David Gohlke
    • 1
  1. 1.Argonne National LaboratoryArgonneUSA
  2. 2.Department of Civil and Environmental EngineeringVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.National Renewable Energy LaboratoryGoldenUSA
  4. 4.Oak Ridge National LaboratoryNational Transportation Research CenterKnoxvilleUSA
  5. 5.Department of Civil and Materials EngineeringUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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