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Climate Change and Its Impact on Vulnerable People

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring
Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 17)

Abstract

Climate change is the greatest threat to people, their survival, the conservation of ecosystems and their ecosystem services. New scientific evidence reviewed in the fifth assessment report of the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2013a, 2014a, b) confirmed that the average global temperature rise is unequivocal and thus supports the assessment of its Fourth Assessment Report (IPCC 2007). Furthermore, its Working Group I (IPCC 2013a) highlighted that the atmosphere and the ocean have warmed up, the layers of snow and ice have decreased, sea level has risen and greenhouse gas concentrations (GHG) in the atmosphere have substantially increased due to anthropogenic GHG emissions. The study also confirmed that each of the last three decades has successively become warmer than any preceding period since 1850 and that the years from 1983 to 2012 have probably been the period of the 30 warmest years during the past 1,400 years.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Regional Centre for Multidisciplinary Research (CRIM)National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)CuernavacaMexico

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