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Food Sovereignty and Green Agriculture

  • Úrsula Oswald Spring
Chapter
Part of the Pioneers in Arts, Humanities, Science, Engineering, Practice book series (PAHSEP, volume 17)

Abstract

The hypothesis of this chapter is that organic green agriculture is granting food sovereignty to countries, to urban dwellers and small-scale producers, while the productivity life sciences paradigm and green revolution have increased malnutrition (obesity) and required artificial components (vitamins, proteins, minerals) to control the deterioration of human health by chronic diseases.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Regional Centre for Multidisciplinary Research (CRIM)National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM)CuernavacaMexico

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