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Paul Auster’s The New York Trilogy

  • Antoine Dechêne
Chapter
Part of the Crime Files book series (CF)

Abstract

This chapter examines Auster’s The New York Trilogy through the lens of the legacy of psychogeography and situationism. An analysis of the Trilogy is also a good place to start discussing important traits of the metacognitive genre such as the figure of the detective-writer, the doppelgänger, locked rooms, transparent mirrors, reflective windows, and, of course, the city background which frequently makes the detectives feel, in Baudelaire’s terms, “anywhere out of the world.”

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Antoine Dechêne
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LiègeLiègeBelgium

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