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Elizabeth Gaskell: Investment Cultures and Global Contexts

  • Nancy Henry
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Literature, Culture and Economics book series (PSLCE)

Abstract

This chapter investigates the financial networks that influenced Gaskell’s early life, including the business activities of her extended family in relation to the financial plots in Mary Barton, Ruth, Cranford, North and South, Sylvia’s Lovers and Wives and Daughters. Gaskell’s investments in docks, railways and real estate demonstrate that her critique of capitalism was complicated by the investments upon which she depended to support herself and her daughters. Shifting the critical and biographical focus away from Manchester and toward Gaskell’s rich explorations of other communities such as Liverpool, Wales and Whitby, Henry emphasizes the importance of familial, economic networks to her identity and her fiction.

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© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nancy Henry
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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