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Making Knowledge Work: The Function of Public Knowledge Organizations in the Netherlands

  • Lionne Koens
  • Bram Harkema
  • Patricia FaasseEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter explores the function and position of public knowledge organizations, such as Research and Technology Organizations and Government Laboratories, in the Netherlands. These organizations provide evidence for policy and support governments, professionals and businesses through research and innovation. Their main mission is not the research itself, but the translation and dissemination of the knowledge gathered. This in order to contribute to better informed policies that ensure the welfare, well-being and safety of society. This chapter analyses the implications of this mission for their activities, legitimacy, position and output. It shows that using science to meet stakeholder needs is a constant and deliberate balancing act, which involves much more than simply changing your research questions.

Keywords

Public knowledge organizations Boundary organizations Hybrid organizations Evidence-informed policy Research and technology organizations Government laboratories 

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Suggestions for Further Reading

  1. Boden, R., Cox, D., Nedeva, M., & Barker, K. (2004). Scrutinising science: The changing UK government of science. London: Palgrave Macmillan.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Crow, M., & Bozeman, B. (1998). Limited by design. R&D laboratories in the U.S. National Innovation System. New York: Colombia University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Gulbrandsen, M. (2011). Research institutes as hybrid organizations: Central challenges to their legitimacy. Policy Science, 44, 215–230.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Jasanoff, S. (1998). The fifth branch: Science advisers as policy makers. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Pielke, R. A., Jr. (2007). The honest broker: Making sense of science in policy and politics. Cambridge, NY: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Rathenau InstituutThe HagueThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Utrecht UniversityUtrechtThe Netherlands

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