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Precedents and Judicial Politics

  • Marie De Somer
Chapter
Part of the European Administrative Governance book series (EAGOV)

Abstract

Drawing on insights from legal theory and political science, this third chapter advances a theoretical framework on the nature and long-term legitimacy-strengthening effects of reasoning by precedent. These legitimacy-strengthening effects are explored for two distinct categories of CJEU interlocutors. That is, first, the Court’s judicial interlocutors, most notably, litigant parties and national courts and, second, non-judicial interlocutors, that is, most importantly, Member States. The theoretical perspectives adduced in the two sections run parallel to one another. Each subsection discusses first, generally, the manner in which adherence to precedent aids the Court in cultivating well-functioning, cooperative relations with each set of interlocutors and how this strengthens the overall positive reception of the Court’s activities by these interlocutors. Next, the sections turn to review how precedents’ legitimating influence, over time, moves beyond the context of singular cases to start operating within the broader, long-term development of these relations.

Keywords

Incrementalism Judicial interlocutors Member States Court legitimacy Judicial autonomy 

References

Primary Sources

    CJEU Case Law

    1. Case C-26/62 NV Algemene Transport- en Expeditie Onderneming van Gend & Loos v Netherlands Inland Revenue Administration [1963] ECR 13.Google Scholar
    2. Case C-6/64 Flaminio Costa v E.N.E.L. [1964] ECR 585.Google Scholar
    3. Case C-85/96 María Martínez Sala v Freistaat Bayern [1998] ECR I-2691.Google Scholar

    Other Documents

    1. Court of Justice of the European Union. (2017). Annual Report 2016. The Year in Review. Retrieved from https://curia.europa.eu/jcms/upload/docs/application/pdf/2017-04/ragp-2016_final_en_web.pdf

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie De Somer
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeuvenLeuvenBelgium

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