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Worldbuilding and World Destroying in BioShock and The Last of Us

  • Stephen Joyce
Chapter

Abstract

Joyce analyses the reasons why the post-apocalyptic is such a popular video game genre and argues that it is a prime example of genre-medium coevolution. First, the chapter explains the impact of video games on convergence culture, in terms of economics and the aesthetic problems of adapting narrative forms into games. Using the concepts of narrative and industrial cores, Joyce argues that the newfound economic power of video games has created dual industrial core franchises. The chapter then examines the ludology-narratology debate and argues that the post-apocalyptic has been hugely influential in meeting the challenge of telling stories to participatory audiences. The post-apocalyptic genre offers game worlds that contain embedded narratives and can easily be enclosed for logical diegetic reasons, making them ideally suited to the medium.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen Joyce
    • 1
  1. 1.Aarhus UniversityAarhus CDenmark

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