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Diagnostic Classification Systems

  • Fabiana Vieira Gauy
  • Thiago Blanco-Vieira
  • Marina Monzani da Rocha
Chapter
Part of the Autism and Child Psychopathology Series book series (ACPS)

Abstract

A number of diagnostic systems including DSM, the WHO IDC, and more recently the NIMH’s Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) have been proposed in the field of child psychopathology and developmental disabilities. This chapter will provide background and history on various diagnostic systems, including categorical and dimensional approaches, and how they apply to childhood problems and disorders. The chapter will also discuss how these systems are relevant to the overall assessment process and how they can be integrated.

Keywords

Diagnostic systems Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM) International Classification of Diseases (ICD) Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fabiana Vieira Gauy
    • 1
    • 2
  • Thiago Blanco-Vieira
    • 3
    • 4
  • Marina Monzani da Rocha
    • 5
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of São Paulo (USP)São PauloBrazil
  2. 2.Instituto Brasiliense de Terapia Cognitivo-Comportamental (IBTCC-DF)São PauloBrazil
  3. 3.Department of PsychiatryUNIFESPSão PauloBrazil
  4. 4.Child and Adolescent Mental Health Specialization Course (CESMIA), Federal University of São Paulo (UNIFESP)São PauloBrazil
  5. 5.Mackenzie Presbyterian UniversitySão PauloBrazil

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