Advertisement

Cognitive and Linguistic Processes in Brazilian Mathematics Education: Theoretical Considerations and Educational Implications

  • Airton Carrião
  • Sintria Labres Lautert
  • Alina Galvão Spinillo
Chapter

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to contribute to the debate about the trends, objects of study, and theoretical and methodological assumptions that have marked and constituted the current identity of working group Cognitive and Linguistic Processes in Mathematics Education of the Brazilian Society of Mathematics Education. The considerations presented bring together a range of investigations that explore the cognitive and linguistic aspects involved in the teaching and learning of mathematics in different learning contexts and different levels of schooling. The work developed by the group has been characterised by investigations conducted on language and communication in the classroom and their sociocultural aspects, alongside studies into the cognitive processes involved in mathematical reasoning. The discussion about the theoretical-methodological questions underlying the reflections on the cognitive and linguistic processes in the Brazilian scenario has been divided into two parts. In the first, we present a historical review of the main trends considered during the first 10 years of working group’s history. In the second, explore the more recent objects of study. We describe how this development indicates a convergence of Brazilian researchers with different theoretical and methodological affiliations, as they search for theoretical models that can explain the role of language, cognition and cultural aspects in the teaching and learning of mathematics. The advances made in terms of knowledge of cognitive and linguistic processes in mathematics education within Brazil are also presented.

Keywords

Psychology of mathematics education Mathematical reasoning Cognitive processes Learning Language in mathematics education 

References

  1. Bakhtin, M., & Voloshinov, V. (1992). Marxismo e Filosofia da Linguagem (6th ed., M. Lahud & Y. L. Vieira, Trans.). São Paulo: Ed. Hucitec. (Original work published 1929).Google Scholar
  2. Borges, F. A., & Nogueira, C. M. I. (2012). Aulas de matemática para alunos surdos inclusos no ensino fundamental. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–20), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  3. Burton, L., & Morgan, C. (2000). Mathematicians writing. Journal for Research in Mathematics Education, 31(4), 429–453.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Carrião, A. (2012). A nominalização como marca do discurso na aula de matemática. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–18), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  5. Charnay, R. (2001). Aprendendo (com) a resolução de problemas. In C. Parra & I. Saiz (Orgs.), Didática da matemática: reflexões pedagógicas (pp. 36–47). Porto Alegre: Artmed.Google Scholar
  6. Chica, C. (2001). Por que formular problemas? In K. Smole & M. Diniz (Orgs.), Ler, escrever e resolver problemas: habilidades básicas para aprender matemática (pp. 151–173). Porto Alegre: Artmed.Google Scholar
  7. Crespo, S. (2003). Learning to pose mathematical problems: Exploring changes in preservice teachers’ practices. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 52, 243–270.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cunha, M. J. G. (2015). Elaboração de problemas combinatórios por professores de matemática do ensino médio. Dissertação de Mestrado, Programa de Pós-graduação em Educação Matemática e Tecnológica da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Brazil.Google Scholar
  9. David, M. M., & Tomaz, V. S. (2012a). Perspectiva de análise micro da estrutura da atividade matemática em sala de aula. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–20), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  10. David, M. M., & Tomaz, V. S. (2012b). The role of visual representations for structuring classroom mathematical activity. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 80, 413–431.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. David, M. M. M. S., & Watson, A. (2008). Participating in what? Using situated cognition theory to illuminate differences in classroom practices. In A. Watson & P. Winbourne (Orgs.), New directions for situated cognition in mathematics education (pp. 31–57). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  12. Duval, R. (1993). Registres de représentation sémiotique et fonctionnement cognitif de la pensée. In Annales de Didactique et de Sciences cognitives, IREM de Starsbourg (Vol. 5, pp. 37–65).Google Scholar
  13. Duval, R. (1995). Sémiósis et pensée humaine:registres sémiotiques et apprentissages intellectuels. Suisse: Peter Lang.Google Scholar
  14. Engeström, Y. (1987). Learning by expanding: An activity-theoretical approach to developmental research. Helsinki: Orienta-Konsultit.Google Scholar
  15. English, L. (1997). The development of fifth-grade children’s problem-posing abilities. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 34, 183–217.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. English, L., & Sriraman, B. (2005). Theories of mathematics education. In H. L. Chick & J. L. Vincent (Eds.), Proceedings of the 29th Conference of the International. Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 1, pp. 170–202). Melbourne: PME.Google Scholar
  17. Fernandes, S. H. A. A., & Healy, L. (2010). Embodied Mathematics: Relationships between doing and imagining in the activities of a blind learner. In Proceedings of the 34th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 2, pp. 345–352), Belo Horizonte, Brazil.Google Scholar
  18. Fernandes, S. H. A. A., Healy, H., & Serino, A. P. (2012). Das relações entre figuras para relações em um espaço matematizável: as percepções de alunos cegos sobre transformações geométricas. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–19), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  19. Fonseca, M. C. F. R. (2010). Adult education and ethnomathematics: Appropriating results, methods, and principles. ZDM Mathematics Education, 42(3), 361–369.Google Scholar
  20. Frade, C., & Borges, O. (2006). The tacit-explicit dimension of the learning of mathematics: An investigation report. International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 4, 293–317.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Frade, C., & Falcão, J. (2007). Exploring connections between tacit knowing and situated learning perspectives in the context of mathematics education. In A. Watson & P. Winbourne (Orgs.), New directions for situated cognition in mathematics education (Vol. 1, pp. 203–231). Norwell: Springer.Google Scholar
  22. Frade, C., & Tatsis, K. (2009). Learning, participation and local school mathematics practice. The Montana Mathematics Enthusiast, 6, 96–112.Google Scholar
  23. Frade, C., Winbourne, P., & Braga, S. A. M. (2009). A mathematics-science community of practice: Crossing boundaries. For the Learning of Mathematics, 29, 14–22.Google Scholar
  24. Frant, J. B. (2009). As time goes by: Technology, embodiment and Cartesian graphics. In Proceedings of the 33th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 1, p. 343), Tessaloniki, Greece.Google Scholar
  25. Frant, J. B. (2012). Linguagem, compressão e algumas implicações para a matemática escolar. Perspectiva de análise micro da estrutura da atividade matemática em sala de aula. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–10), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  26. Freire, P. C., & Lima, R. N. (2012). O subconstruto parte-todo: uma análise com os três mundos da matemática. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–20), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  27. Garnica, A. V. M., Soares, M. T. C., & Buriasco, R. L. C. (2006). Anais do III Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática. Águas de Lindoia: Sociedade Brasileira de Educação Matemática, São Paulo.Google Scholar
  28. Gonzales, N. A. (1994). Problem posing: A neglected component in mathematics courses for prospective elementary and middle school teachers’. School Science and Mathematics, 94(2), 78–84.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Hazin, I., Da Rocha Falcão, J. T., & Leitão, S. (2006). Mathematical impairment among epileptic children. In Proceedings of the 34th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 3, pp. 249–256), Prague, Czech Republic.Google Scholar
  30. Healy, L., & Fernandes, S. H. A. A. (2008). The role of gestures in the mathematical practices of blind learners. In Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of PME 32 and PME-NA XXX (Vol. 3, pp. 137–144). Morelia, México: Cinvestav-UMSNH.Google Scholar
  31. Healy, L., & Fernandes, S. H. A. A. (2011). The role of gestures in the mathematical practices of those who do not see with their eyes. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 77(2), 157–174.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Hoffmann, M. H. G. (2006). What is a “semiotic perspective”, and what could it be? Some comments on the contributions to this special issue. Educational Studies in Mathematics, 61, 279–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Itacarambi, R. R. (2010). Resolução de problemas nos anos iniciais do ensino fundamental. São Paulo: Editora Livraria da Física.Google Scholar
  34. Kistemann, M. A., Jr. (2012). A produção de significados e a tomada de decisão de indivíduos-consumidores. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–13), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  35. Lakoff, G., & Johnson, M. (1999). Philosophy in the flesh: The embodied mind and its challenge to western thought. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  36. Lautert, S. L., & Spinillo, A. G. (2012). Os princípios invariantes da divisão como foco de um estudo de intervenção com crianças. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–13), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  37. Lautert, S. L., Spinillo, A., & Correa, J. (2012). Children’s difficulties with division: An intervention study. Journal of Medicine and Medical Sciences, 1, 447–456.Google Scholar
  38. Leontiev, A. N. (1978). Activity, consciousness, personality. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  39. Leung, S. S., & Silver, E. A. (1997). The role of task format, mathematics knowledge, and creative thinking on the arithmetic problem posing of prospective elementary school teachers. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 9(1), 5–24.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Lins, R. C. (1994). O modelo teórico dos campos semânticos: uma análise epistemológica da álgebra e do pensamento algébrico. Revista Dynamis, 1(7), 29–39.Google Scholar
  41. Lopes, A. C., & Magina, S. (2012). O xadrez e o estudante: uma relação que pode dar certo na resolução de problema matemáticos. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–20), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  42. Lowrie, T. (2002). Young children posing problems: The influence of teacher intervention on the type of problems children pose. Mathematics Education Research Journal, 14(2), 87–98.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Magina, S. M. P., Spinillo, A. G., & Melo, L. M. (2015). As estratégias de estudantes dos anos iniciais na resolução de problema combinatório. In Anais do VI Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–12), Pirenópolis, Goiás.Google Scholar
  44. Meaney, T. (2005). Mathematics as text. In A. Chronaki & I. M. Christiansen (Orgs.) Challenging perspectives on mathematics classroom communication. Connecticut: Information Age Publishing.Google Scholar
  45. Merlini, V., Santos, A., Teixeira, A. C., & Magina, S. M. P. (2015). Processo formativo centrado na escola: as reflexões da professora Maria. In Anais do VI Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (p. 13), Pirenópolis, Goiás.Google Scholar
  46. Moro, M. L. F., & Soares, M. T. C. (2006). Níveis de raciocínio combinatório e produto cartesiano na escola fundamental. Revista Educação Matemática Pesquisa, 8(1), 99–124.Google Scholar
  47. Moschkovich, J. N. (2010). Language and mathematics education: Multiple perspectives and directions for research. Charlotte: Information Age Publishing.Google Scholar
  48. Oliveira, D. L., Albuquerque, L. C., & Gontijo, C. H. (2012). Criatividade matemática: alguns elementos na divisão de quadrados. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–19), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  49. Onuchic, L. R., & Alevato, N. S. G. (2004). Novas reflexões sobre o ensino-aprendizagem de matemática através da resolução de problemas. In M. A. V. Bicudo & M. C. Borba (Orgs.), Educação matemática: Pesquisa em movimento (pp. 213–223). São Paulo: Cortez.Google Scholar
  50. Pires, C. M. C., Curi, E., Rabelllo, M., Pavanello, R., & Valente, W. R. (2003). Anais do II Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática. Sociedade Brasileira de Educação Matemática. São Paulo: Santos.Google Scholar
  51. Rabello, M., Lins, R., & Da Rocha Falcão. (2000). Processos cognitivos e linguísticos na Educação matemática. In T. M. Campos & C. M. C. Pires Anais do I Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática. Sociedade Brasileira de Educação Matemática (pp. 329–372). São Paulo: Serra Negra.Google Scholar
  52. Schön, D. (2000). Educando o Profissional Reflexivo: um novo design para o ensino e aprendizagem. Porto Alegre: Artes Médicas Sul.Google Scholar
  53. Sfard, A. (2008). Thinking as communicating. Cambridge University Press. Ebook.Google Scholar
  54. Sfard, A. (2012). Introduction: Developing mathematical discourse—Some insights from communicational research. International Journal of Educational Research, 51–52, 1–9.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  55. Skovsmose, O. (2005). Foregrounds and politics of learning obstacles. For the Learning of Mathematics, 25(1), 4–10.Google Scholar
  56. Souza, E. R. R. de. (2015). Estruturas multiplicativas: Concepção de professor de Ensino Fundamental. Dissertação de Mestrado, Programa de Pós-Graduação em Educação Matemática, Universidade Estadual de Santa Cruz.Google Scholar
  57. Spinillo, A. G., & Lautert, S. (2006). Exploring the role played by the remainder in the solution of division problems. In Proceedings of the 30th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 5, pp. 153–160).Google Scholar
  58. Spinillo, A. G., Lautert, S. L., Santos, E. M., & Silva, J. F. G. (2015). Uma análise de problemas do campo multiplicativo elaborados por professores do Ensino Fundamental I. In Anais do VI Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–9), Pirenópolis, Goiás.Google Scholar
  59. Spinillo, A. G., & Silva, J. F. G. (2010). Making explicit the principles governing combinatorial reasoning: Does it help children to solve Cartesian product problems? In Proceedings of the 34th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 4, pp. 216–224).Google Scholar
  60. Spinillo, A. G., Silva, J. F. G., & Lautert, S. L. (2016). Ensino e aprendizagem de conceitos matemáticos a partir da explicitação dos princípios invariantes. In J. A. de Castro Filho, M. Chagas, P. M. Barguil, D. L. Maia, & J. Lima (Orgs.), Matemática, cultura e tecnologia: perspectivas internacionais (pp. 35–48) Curitiba: CRV.Google Scholar
  61. Tardif, M. (2002). Saberes docentes e formação profissional. Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro: Editora Vozes.Google Scholar
  62. Tomaz, V. S., & David, M. M. (2011). Classroom activity promoting students’ learning about the use of drawings in geometry. In Proceedings of the 35th Conference of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education (Vol. 4, pp. 257–264).Google Scholar
  63. Torisu, E. M. (2012). Acompanhamento extraclasse e fortalecimento das crenças de autoeficácia matemática. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática (pp. 1–22), Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  64. Vergnaud, G. (1983). Multiplicative structures. In R. Lesh & M. Landau (Eds.), Acquisitions of mathematics concepts and procedures (pp. 127–174). New York: Academic.Google Scholar
  65. Vergnaud, G. (1988). Multiplicative structures. In H. Hiebert & M. Behr (Eds.), Research agenda in mathematics education. Number concepts and operations in the middle grades (pp. 141–161). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  66. Vergnaud, G. (1990). La théorie des champs conceptuels. Recherches en Didactique des Mathématiques, Grenoble, 10(23), 133–170.Google Scholar
  67. Vergnaud, G. (2003). A gênese dos campos conceituais. In E. Grossi (Org.). Por que ainda há quem não aprende? A teoria (pp. 21–60). Ed. Vozes, RJ: Petrópolis.Google Scholar
  68. Viana, O. A. (2012). A identificação de propriedades e a habilidade de planificação de figuras geométricas espaciais. In Anais do V Seminário Internacional de Pesquisa em Educação Matemática Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro.Google Scholar
  69. Zunino, D. L. (1995). A matemática na escola: aqui e agora. Porto Alegre: Artes Médicas.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Airton Carrião
    • 1
  • Sintria Labres Lautert
    • 2
  • Alina Galvão Spinillo
    • 2
  1. 1.Universidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo HorizonteBrazil
  2. 2.Universidade Federal de PernambucoRecifeBrazil

Personalised recommendations