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The Israeli Child Protection System

  • Ruth Gottfried
  • Asher Ben-Arieh
Chapter
Part of the Child Maltreatment book series (MALT, volume 8)

Abstract

The current chapter comprises the first-time inclusion of Israel’s child protection system in a comparative survey of such systems worldwide. Following the introduction, the chapter describes the historical development of social services and child protection in Israel, relevant governmental commissions, and the prevention-oriented ‘360 Degrees – Israeli National Program for Children and Youth at Risk’. The child protection legislative framework for child maltreatment, including the ‘Youth (Care and Supervision) Law’, and the ‘Mandatory Reporting Law’ are additional topics addressed herein. Likewise reviewed are the topics of substantiations and responses, ‘Planning, Intervention and Evaluation Committees’, out-of-home placements and adoption. A critical overview highlighting current pressing challenges facing the system culminates the chapter; followed by a conclusions section comprising a summary and recommendations.

Acronyms

EBP:

Evidence Based Practices

ELI:

Association for Child Protection

IMLSASS:

Israel Ministry of Labor, Social Affairs and Social Services

IMLW:

Israel Ministry of Labor and Welfare

IMW:

Israel Ministry of Welfare

IMWSS:

Israel Ministry of Welfare and Social Services

INCC:

Israel National Council for the Child

PIEC:

Planning, Intervention, and Evaluation Committee

SSD:

Social Services Department

SWAL:

Social Worker to the Adoption Law

SWCP:

Social Worker to Court Proceedings

SWYL:

Social Worker to the Youth Law

SWDL:

Social Worker to the Disabilities Law (i.e., social worker for the law of protection of people with developmental and mental disabilities)

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.The David Yellin Academic College of EducationJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.The Haruv Institute and the Paul Baerwald School of Social Work and Social WelfareThe Hebrew University of JerusalemJerusalemIsrael

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