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Parent-Directed Interaction-Toddler

  • Emma I. Girard
  • Nancy M. Wallace
  • Jane R. Kohlhoff
  • Susan S. J. Morgan
  • Cheryl B. McNeil
Chapter

Abstract

The most fundamental aspect of PDI-T lies in the basic understanding that this phase of treatment is meant to teach listening skills, rather than implement consequences for noncompliance. Toddlers are in the process of learning the necessary abilities to comply with demands. Therefore, noncompliance is conceptualized as a lack of applicable listening skills. In turn, such skill deficits must lead to the increased provision of appropriate opportunities to learn listening skills. Listening skills are taught using a guided compliance procedure, commonly used in applied behavior analysis to help children of varying abilities learn called the “Tell-Show-Try Again-Guide” procedure.

Keywords

Parent-Child Interaction Therapy with Toddlers (PCIT-T) Parent-directed interaction-toddler (PDI-T) Guided compliance steps Language encouragement of toddlers Coaching considerations in PCIT with toddlers Teaching listening skills to toddlers PRIDE skills CARES model 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emma I. Girard
    • 1
  • Nancy M. Wallace
    • 2
  • Jane R. Kohlhoff
    • 3
    • 4
  • Susan S. J. Morgan
    • 4
  • Cheryl B. McNeil
    • 5
  1. 1.School of MedicineUniversity of California, RiversideRiversideUSA
  2. 2.Johns Hopkins School of MedicineKennedy Krieger InstituteBaltimoreUSA
  3. 3.School of PsychiatryUniversity of New South WalesRandwickAustralia
  4. 4.Karitane Toddler ClinicCarramarAustralia
  5. 5.Department of PsychologyWest Virginia UniversityMorgantownUSA

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