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Organizing: Making Plans Together

  • Tineke Abma
  • Sarah Banks
  • Tina Cook
  • Sónia Dias
  • Wendy Madsen
  • Jane Springett
  • Michael T. Wright
Chapter

Chapter Summary

Abstract

In this chapter you will be led step-by-step in how to organize a participatory research project. This includes identifying the various tasks and roles within the project, estimating the resources needed, matching the strengths of the participants to the tasks at hand, and planning how the project will be done. Issues of capacity building and sustainability are also addressed.

Purpose

To guide you in organizing the research process.

Central Question

How do we organize the research process?

Keywords

Identifying skills Planning for sustainability Planning and managing the research process Identifying resources Determining roles Setting a timeline Forming the research team 

Further Reading and Sources of Inspiration

  1. Cook, T. (2009). The purpose of mess in action research: Building rigour through a messy turn. Educational Action Research, 17(2), 277–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Janes, J. E. (2016). Democratic encounters? Epistemic privilege, power, and community-based participatory action research. Action Research, 14(1), 72–87.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

References

  1. Cook, T. (2009). The purpose of mess in action research: Building rigour through a messy turn. Educational Action Research, 17(2), 277–291.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Laycock, A., et al. (2011). Researching indigenous health. A practical guide for researchers. Melbourne: The Lowitja Institute.Google Scholar
  3. Walkers, M. (2009). Capabilities, flourishing and the normative purposes of action research. In S. Noffke & B. Somwkh (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of educational action research (pp. 301–312). London: Routledge.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Wicks, P. G., Reason, P., & Bradbury, H. (2013). Living inquiry: Personal, political and philosophical groundings for action research practice. In P. Reason & H. Bradbury (Eds.), The SAGE handbook of action research: Participative inquiry and practice (2nd ed., pp. 15–30). London: Sage Publications.Google Scholar
  5. Woelders, S., Abma, T., Visser, T., & Schipper, K. (2015). The power of difference in inclusive research. Disability & Society, 30(4), 528–542.  https://doi.org/10.1080/09687599.2015.1031880.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tineke Abma
    • 1
  • Sarah Banks
    • 2
  • Tina Cook
    • 3
  • Sónia Dias
    • 4
  • Wendy Madsen
    • 5
  • Jane Springett
    • 6
  • Michael T. Wright
    • 7
  1. 1.Amsterdam Public Health Research InstituteVU University Medical CentreAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of SociologyDurham UniversityDurhamUK
  3. 3.Department of Disability and EducationLiverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK
  4. 4.National School of Public HealthUniversidade Nova LisboaLisbonPortugal
  5. 5.School of Health, Medical & Applied SciencesCentral Queensland UniversityRockhamptonAustralia
  6. 6.Centre for Healthy Communities, School of Public HealthUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  7. 7.Institute for Social HealthCatholic University of Applied SciencesBerlinGermany

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