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Getting Started: The Initiation of a Partnership

  • Tineke Abma
  • Sarah Banks
  • Tina Cook
  • Sónia Dias
  • Wendy Madsen
  • Jane Springett
  • Michael T. Wright
Chapter

Chapter Summary

Abstract

This chapter discusses what to consider at the start of a process of participatory research. This includes clarifying what different parties understand by “research”, what type of research they want to undertake for what purpose, and the value of making a “working agreement” based on discussions about how to conduct research in a way that is fair, respectful and beneficial to all co-researchers and research informants. The chapter introduces a set of ethical principles and practical guidelines for conducting participatory research, considering the specific ethical issues in participatory research relating to partnership, use of power and blurring of boundaries between researchers and informants. It also considers how to handle ethical concerns common to all social research about informed consent, privacy, anonymity, falsification of data, and what these mean in a participatory research context. Illustrations are given from examples of participatory research projects.

Purpose

To offer an overview of practical and ethical (including relational) considerations to bear in mind at the start of a participatory research project.

Central Question

What are the main practical and ethical considerations to bear in mind and prepare for when getting started with participatory research?

Keywords

Building trust Collaborative partnerships Ethical issues Handling information Working agreement 

Further Reading and Sources of Inspiration

  1. Banks, S., & Brydon-Miller, M. (Eds.). (2019). Ethics in participatory research for health and social well-being. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  2. Banks, S., Armstrong, A., et al. (2013). Everyday ethics in community-based participatory research. Contemporary Social Science, 8(3), 263–277. Available to download for free at www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/21582041.2013.769618#.VMDNaE-hTIU CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. (2012). Community-based participatory research: A guide to ethical principles and practice. Bristol: NCCPE. Available at: www.durham.ac.uk/beacon/socialjustice/ethics_consultation

References

  1. Banks, S. (2012). Ethics. In S. Becker, A. Bryman, & H. Ferguson (Eds.), Understanding research for social policy and social work (2nd ed.) (pp. 58–61). Bristol: The Policy Press.Google Scholar
  2. Banks, S. (2015). Action research for social justice: researching and organising on household debt. In L. Hardwick, R. Smith, & A. Worsley (Eds.), Innovations in social work research: Using methods creatively (pp. 18–39). Jessica Kingsley: London.Google Scholar
  3. Banks, S., Brown, G., Flaherty, J., Herrington, T., & Waters, M. (2013a). Debt on Teesside: Pathways to financial inclusion, research briefing. Durham: Centre for Social Justice and Community Action, Durham University. www.dur.ac.uk/socialjustice/researchprojects/debt_on_teesside/
  4. Banks, S., Armstrong, A., et al. (2013b). Everyday ethics in community-based participatory research. Contemporary Social Science, 8(3), 263–277.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Carter, K., Banks, S., Armstrong, A., Kindon, S., & Burkitt, I. (2013). Issues of disclosure and intrusion: Ethical challenges for a community researcher. Ethics and Social Welfare, 7(1), 92–100.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. (2012). Community-based participatory research: A guide to ethical principles and practice. Bristol: NCCPE. Available at: www.durham.ac.uk/beacon/socialjustice/ethics_consultation
  7. Centre for Social Justice and Community Action and National Coordinating Centre for Public Engagement. (2013). Doing research together: How to make sure things are fair and no one is harmed. Durham: Centre for Social Justice and Community Action. www.durham.ac.uk/socialjustice/ethics_consultation
  8. Cook, T., & Inglis, P. (2012). Participatory research with men with learning disability: Informed consent. Tizard Learning Disability Review, 17(2), 92–101.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. International Collaboration on Participatory Health Research (ICPHR). (2013). Position paper 2: Participatory health research: A guide to ethical principles and practice. Berlin: ICPHR. www.icphr.org/position-papers
  10. Iphofen, R. (2011). Ethical decision-making in social research. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  11. Oliver, P. (2010). The student’s guide to research ethics (2nd ed.). Maidenhead: Open University Press/McGraw-Hill Education.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tineke Abma
    • 1
  • Sarah Banks
    • 2
  • Tina Cook
    • 3
  • Sónia Dias
    • 4
  • Wendy Madsen
    • 5
  • Jane Springett
    • 6
  • Michael T. Wright
    • 7
  1. 1.Amsterdam Public Health Research InstituteVU University Medical CentreAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of SociologyDurham UniversityDurhamUK
  3. 3.Department of Disability and EducationLiverpool Hope UniversityLiverpoolUK
  4. 4.National School of Public HealthUniversidade Nova LisboaLisbonPortugal
  5. 5.School of Health, Medical & Applied SciencesCentral Queensland UniversityRockhamptonAustralia
  6. 6.Centre for Healthy Communities, School of Public HealthUniversity of AlbertaEdmontonCanada
  7. 7.Institute for Social HealthCatholic University of Applied SciencesBerlinGermany

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