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Empirical Research in REBT Theory and Practice

  • Daniel O. DavidEmail author
  • Mădălina Sucală
  • Carmen Coteț
  • Radu Șoflău
  • Sergiu Vălenaș
Chapter

Abstract

The theory of REBT was developed by Ellis (1962, 1994), being seen by many in the field as the first form of CBT (e.g., Hollon & DiGiuseppe, 2010) and as a major contributor to the cognitive revolution in psychology and psychotherapy (David, 2015). First labeled Rational Therapy, it was renamed Rational Emotive Therapy before receiving the current name: Rational Emotive Behavior Therapy (David, 2015). In a personal communication to one of the chapter’s authors (Dr. David), Albert Ellis (2005) would have liked to finally name it Cognitive Affective Behavior Therapy.

Keywords

REBT theory REBT practice Rational beliefs Irrational beliefs Functional emotions Dysfunctional emotions Empirical status 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel O. David
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Mădălina Sucală
    • 1
  • Carmen Coteț
    • 3
  • Radu Șoflău
    • 3
  • Sergiu Vălenaș
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy“Babeș-Bolyai” University of Cluj-NapocaCluj-NapocaRomania
  2. 2.Ichan School of Medicine at Mount SinaiNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.International Institute for the Advanced Studies of Psychotherapy and Applied Mental Health“Babeș-Bolyai” University of Cluj-NapocaCluj-NapocaRomania

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