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Rational Emotive Behavior Education in Schools

  • Ann Vernon
  • Michael E. Bernard
Chapter

Abstract

Albert Ellis pioneered the application of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT) to the treatment of children and adolescents in the mid 1950s, and it has a long-standing history of application in schools. As Ellis stated, “I have always believed in the potential of REBT to be used in schools as a form of mental health promotion and with young people experiencing developmental problems” (Ellis & Bernard, 2006, p. ix). Many years ago Ellis stressed the importance of a prevention curriculum designed to help young people “help themselves” by learning positive mental health concepts that will benefit them in the present as well as in the future (Ellis, 1972).

Keywords

REBT Rational emotive education Teacher self-efficacy Teacher training 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Vernon
    • 1
  • Michael E. Bernard
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.University of Northern IowaCedar FallsUSA
  2. 2.Melbourne Graduate School of EducationUniversity of MelbourneParkvilleAustralia
  3. 3.California State University, Long BeachLong BeachUSA

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