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As Far as Manifestos Go

  • Guillermo Rebollo Gil
Chapter
Part of the New Caribbean Studies book series (NCARS)

Abstract

This chapter seeks to establish the scope and tone of the book. In doing so, it offers a critical reflection on social privilege, specifically, on how a sincere engagement with decolonial theory requires an accounting of one’s own privilege.

Keywords

Turning Metaphors Privilege Colonial wounding 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillermo Rebollo Gil
    • 1
  1. 1.Universidad del EsteCarolinaPuerto Rico

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