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CLIC Pedagogy: Reflections

  • Gaiyan Wang
Chapter

Abstract

Results of the investigation are discussed within the conceptual framework, which delineates the relationships among the four key concepts investigated. In the discussion it is concluded that, while CLIC-based linguistic abilities will grow with learners’ general L2 proficiency, the power of CLIC instruction mainly lies in its effectiveness in enhancing learners’ self-confidence in making lexical inferences, which is crucial for the development of LA in reading since it helps to speed up students’ progress from an intermediate to an advanced level of L2 learning.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gaiyan Wang
    • 1
  1. 1.School of English StudiesXi’an International Studies UniversityXi’anChina

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