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Pioneers, Political Entrepreneurs and Heterarchy in the Borderland

  • Thomas Hüsken
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Series in African Borderlands Studies book series (PSABS)

Abstract

This chapter discusses local actors and locality and the power of kinship as the principal social resource for the Awald ‘Ali. It deals with political biographies, political practices and the rationales of local tribal politicians as producers of local and interconnected trans-local political order. The chapter defines these politicians according to generation and function as “pioneers” and “political entrepreneurs.” The scope of heterarchy in the borderland is explored here, with sections on legal pluralism, political institutions, the role of new technologies and, finally, the Arab revolutions.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Hüsken
    • 1
  1. 1.University of BayreuthBayreuthGermany

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