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Fraud and Corruption: A European Perspective

  • Maximilian Edelbacher
Chapter

Abstract

Having had many years of practical police work experience as well as experience in the theory of crime and its causation while teaching at different institutions about deviant behavior of all kinds, especially with violent crime, theft, corruption, organized crime, white-collar crime, financial crime, money laundering, and fraud, the conclusions from all these experiences made it clear that there exists an intensive relationship between corruption, terrorism, and organized crime.

Research outcomes and practical experience dealing with issues of crime show that there is a close relationship between corruption, terrorism, organized crime, and white-collar crime. In this chapter the link and nexus between corruption, organized crime, white-collar crime, and fraud and the shadow economy are highlighted with examples and statistical data. Although the relationship between terrorism and corruption is not a major focus of the chapter, the connection is considered in the context of explaining a major type of crime such as money laundering.

The author draws on his many years of experience as head of the major crimes bureau in Austria as a police chief in one of the most crime prone districts of Vienna to provide an in-depth account of the importance of prevention corruption and fraud in order to achieve the goals of the society. As a specialist in combatting organized crime, he soon learned that organized criminal groups must be successful in corrupting officials and people in power positions to be successful in their transnational criminal activities such as trafficking of humans, weapons, drugs, stolen art, and other criminal acts. To reach their goals those engaged in criminal activities have developed and used numerous technical and communicative devices. It appears as if in the present society, one can buy anything if the price is right.

Keywords

Corruption Fraud Money laundering Bribery European Union OECD Anti-corruption organizations Ghost money operations Fraud through mediation Organized crime White-collar crime Corporate crime International cooperation 

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maximilian Edelbacher
    • 1
  1. 1.Academic Council of the United NationsSystem Liaison Office ViennaViennaAustria

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