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Man in Space

  • Umberto Cavallaro
Chapter
Part of the Springer Praxis Books book series (PRAXIS)

Abstract

The Space Race had well and truly begun. It was still unclear what the ultimate goal would be, but the USA was in the running. The USAF began the secret Man-In-Space-Soonest program (MISS) which – in competition with the Adam project of Von Braun’s Army team and the Navy’s Manned Earth Reconnaissance program – was intended to put a man into space before the Soviet Union, using a rocket-boosted, winged manned space vehicle that would follow on from the X-15 rocket plane. [1]

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Umberto Cavallaro
    • 1
  1. 1.Italian Astrophilately SocietyVillarbasseItaly

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