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Introduction

  • Angela Kershaw
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Languages at War book series (PASLW)

Abstract

The introduction locates the historical scope of the book in relation to contemporary debates about fictional representations of the Second World War in France and Britain. It outlines the book’s central methodology of ‘reading translationally’, which relies on a conception of translation as a reading practice. To read translationally is to understand translation in its broadest sense, as a cultural practice, without discarding the importance of actual, interlingual translation. The book’s focus on the translation of French Second World War fiction into English is contextualised in relation to recent research in French and English literary studies, war and culture studies, translation and Holocaust studies, and memory studies.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Kershaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Modern LanguagesUniversity of BirminghamBirminghamUK

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