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Significance of the “Visceral” in Lived Religion Studies of Trauma

  • Michelle A. Walsh
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Lived Religion and Societal Challenges book series (PSLRSC)

Abstract

Drawing on autoethnographic experiences, the author of this chapter explores the visceral moment of trauma as a source of embodied knowing within lived religion studies. She argues that the visceral impact of trauma uniquely elicits the religious impulse to making meaning in the aftermath. Trauma has a capacity thoroughly to disrupt what the author has described as “world-sense,” the metaphysical foundation of one’s sense of the world, which in turn fosters moral injury as well as a desire to transcend and repair one’s meaning-making frame on an experiential level. This chapter explores implications of this for ethnographic methods as well as for ethics, power, and interdisciplinary approaches in the academy, including an expansion of the concept of “queerness” to embodied knowing in the disciplines.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Social WorkBoston UniversityBostonUSA

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