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Management of Humoral Primary Immunodeficiencies in Pediatrics

  • Chiara Azzari
  • Clementina Canessa
Chapter
Part of the Rare Diseases of the Immune System book series (RDIS)

Abstract

Children affected by humoral immunodeficiencies need a multidisciplinary medical approach. Immunoglobulin replacement therapy has a crucial role. In the last decades, subcutaneous immunoglobulin treatment has drastically changed patients’ quality of life. Many other strategies that contribute to a global management of the disease have to be applied. Respiratory physiotherapy represents the other pillar of the care of these patients. Optimal management also includes prevention strategies in order to avoid systemic complications. Treatment needs to be coordinated with a defined follow-up schedule in a pediatric immunology center. The follow-up should be in line with current recommendations but, at the same time, tailored to the needs of the specific patient.

Keywords

Management Immunoglobulin Subcutaneous Physiotherapy Screening Family education Prevention Pediatric PID 

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© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Paediatric Immunology DepartmentMeyer Children’s HospitalFlorenceItaly

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