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Political Consumerism at the Individual Level

  • Carolin V. Zorell
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter shows that there is not one type of ‘political consumer’, but several. Individuals may decide to only boycott, buycott products, buycott firms or combine the various modes. Drawing on comprehensive survey data from Germany, the author presents three variables which influence which mode citizens choose. First, their ‘concept of the state’, that is, their understanding of which duties and responsibilities belong to the state, to companies and to the citizens, determines whether they become political consumers in the first place. Second, the degree to which they have more confidence in labelled as compared with non-labelled products, and confidence in firms which are involved in Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) compared with the non-involved, influences their tendency to buycott either products or firms. Finally, the author shows that boycotters are not particularly distrusting. They have high confidence in labelling schemes theoretically. However, they appear to lack access to trusted schemes in practice.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolin V. Zorell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MannheimMannheimGermany

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