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Explaining Political Consumerism

  • Carolin V. Zorell
Chapter

Abstract

The rise of political consumerism is set against the background of a profoundly evolving macro-environment. This chapter elaborates on the implications which those processes engender for the relationship between politics and the business sector, and it describes how the changes and the rise of political consumerism are connected. Inspired by the theories of political culture and ‘varieties of capitalism’, the chapter delineates a theory on attitudes concerning the duties and responsibilities of the state, firms and citizens, and people’s understanding of cooperation, that is the ‘concept of the state’. The author discusses how this ‘concept of the state’ relates to labelling schemes and CSR, which both can give consumers orientation and confidence in their political purchasing but are fundamentally different in nature. Connecting the various observations, the author presents a multi-layered explanation for why and how in similar contexts buycotting and boycotting evolve differently.

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Carolin V. Zorell
    • 1
  1. 1.University of MannheimMannheimGermany

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