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Life After Life: Survival in the (Late) Fiction of Alice Munro

  • Naomi Morgenstern
Chapter
Part of the Palgrave Studies in Affect Theory and Literary Criticism book series (PSATLC)

Abstract

This chapter examines the motif of survival in a pair of stories by Alice Munro that concern women who survive violent men and in a series of stories that involve parents who are abandoned by their children. Munro depicts an experience of life after life that disrupts conventional humanist accounts of the decisive function of death in the teleology of the subject, thereby offering us a philosophical account of living on that sheds light on Jacques Derrida’s account of life as survival. Engaging with the distinct significance of this survival for women, Munro’s late fiction revisits the figure of the self-sacrificing mother and the woman who refuses to play a sacrificial role and helps us to describe the gendered contours of a posthumanist ontology.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naomi Morgenstern
    • 1
  1. 1.University of TorontoTorontoCanada

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